Types of fats

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Fat

Fat is an important element in the human body as it is involved in a wide range of body functions, such as building cells, protecting the body’s internal organs, maintaining body heat, providing a source of energy, helping to absorb certain vitamins from foods, and contributing to the production of hormones necessary to perform a proper function, so the key to proper nutrition is to get a good balance between fats and other nutrients and to choose healthy fats in the right amounts as not all types of fat are harmful to health.

Types of fats

Not all types of fats are equal in terms of health, as all foods and oils contain a mixture of fatty acids, but the dominant type of fat is what makes them good or harmful, some fats are better than others, and can help promote health, so knowing the difference between types of fats helps to determine the fats to be avoided, fats that should be taken in moderation, and here is an explanation of the types of fats:

  • Good fats: Trans fats are healthy fats that should be incorporated into the diet in moderation, and foods that contain these fats are often liquid at room temperature, and the explanation for the types of good fats:
  • Monounsaturated fats: Where the molecules of these fats are not saturated with hydrogen atoms, each fat molecule has only one hydrogen atom, and these fats can lower harmful cholesterol levels (LDL) and keep good cholesterol levels) High, but if a person does not reduce saturated fat intake, cholesterol levels may remain unchanged and may reduce the risk of heart disease, and sources of monounsaturated fats, olive oil, olives, nuts, avocado, and peanut butter.
  • Polyunsaturated fats: They are not fully saturated with hydrogen atoms, and are useful for health, especially species found in fish, called omega-3 fats, as omega-3 helps prevent heart disease by lowering cholesterol levels and infections in Blood, may reduce symptoms associated with joint problems, some skin diseases, and there is another type of fat, called omega-6, which is often found in vegetable oils and processed foods and can cause overconsumption of omega-6 to increase inflammation within the body, and from fat sources Polyunsaturated: fatty fish such as sardines, mackerel, salmon, herring, nuts, seeds, vegetable oils.
  • Harmful fats: Most of these fats are solid at room temperature, and here’s an explanation of the types of harmful fats:
  • Saturated fats: It is a solid fat at room temperature and is considered fully saturated, as each fat molecule is saturated with hydrogen atoms, and the consumption of saturated fats in large quantities, in the long run, is associated with increased health risks, as it can cause high cholesterol levels, which increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, strokes, and sources of saturated fats: red meat and its products, poultry skin, dairy products, coconut oil, palm oil, and cocoa butter.
  • Saturated fats: It is a solid fat at room temperature and is considered fully saturated, as each fat molecule is saturated with hydrogen atoms, and the consumption of saturated fats in large quantities, in the long run, is associated with increased health risks, as it can cause high cholesterol levels, which increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, strokes, and sources of saturated fats: red meat and its products, poultry skin, dairy products, coconut oil, palm oil, and cocoa butter.

Tips for choosing healthy fats

Some changes can be made to the diet by eating foods rich in monounsaturated fats instead of consuming foods rich in saturated fats, but you should not overeat healthy fats, to contain all types of fat satin at high calories, and the following points show some tips for choosing healthy fats:

  • Avoid trans fats by checking that the ingredient list does not contain partially hydrogenated fats, and looking for the number of trans fats in the nutritional value table, where the percentage of trans fats can be included 0%, but contains less than 0.5 grams of trans fats.
  • Use oil like olive oil instead of solid fats like butter.
  • Eat fish instead of meat at least twice a week for healthy omega-3 fats, and grill them instead of frying them.
  • Choose lean meats and skin-free poultry.
  • Choose healthy snacks such as fruits, vegetables, and nuts, as most ready-made snacks are high in saturated and trans fat.

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